If you have not read my book, Fabulous Food  for Health and Healing, it is suggested you read it for information on the benefits of ingredients to help prevent or slow the onset of alzheimer’s.  What about relieving arthtirits pain?   I guarantee you will use those ingredients more often if you knew the health benefits!

ARTHRITIS

A healthy eating plan can greatly reduce the painful symptoms of arthritis. Here are the best anti-inflammatory foods to pick, plus tips on which foods to avoid.According to the National Institutes of Health, arthritis affects just over one in every five people in the United States — most of whom don’t realize how much nutrition can improve the way they feel. Your best bet for reducing pain is an anti-inflammatory diet; this section can help you create one.

With some thought and planning, it’s easy to make these nutrient-dense foods part of your daily diet.  With choices from virtually every food group, you’ll soon be well on your way to arming yourself to battle the pain of arthritis and begin to manage it from the inside out.

salmon

Salmon is among the richest sources of healthy fats, making it an ideal source of omega-3 fatty acids. In addition, salmon contains calcium, vitamin D, and folate. Besides helping with arthritis, eating salmon may protect the cardiovascular system by preventing blood clots, repairing artery damage, raising levels of good cholesterol, and lowering blood pressure.

CC_2http://www.keciaclarke.com/watch-culinary-conversations/

Commonly referred to as one of nature’s ‘perfect foods,’ bananas are perhaps best known for packing potassium, but they’re also good sources of arthritis-fighting vitamin B6, folate, and vitamin C. They’re easy for your body to digest, and since they’re a great source of soluble fiber, they are an important player in your weight loss efforts, because you fill full after eating one without consuming a large number of calories.

 

If you are in need of vitamin C but aren’t a big fan of citrus fruits, reach for a green pepper. A single green pepper contains 176 percent of your daily needs for vitamin C — and colorful red and yellow varieties have more than double that amount. That makes them richer in C than citrus fruits, but sweet peppers are also excellent sources of vitamin B6 and folate.

Vitamin D is a tough one to come by in foods, but shrimp fills that bill, since they have about 30 percent of the daily recommended amount in about three ounces – much more than a cup of milk.  Shrimp also contains omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin C, along with other nutrients essential for general health, including iron and vitamin B12.

Hard or soft, fresh or ripened, cheese in all its variety is an excellent source of calcium for bones, and protein for muscles and other joint-supporting tissues. Cheese can be easily sliced to put on a cracker or a sandwich, grated into your favorite recipe, or eaten alongside an apple or pear for a fresh, quick snack.

Green tea contains hundreds of powerful antioxidant chemicals called polyphenols and has been cited for helping prevent problems ranging from cancer to heart disease. But studies also suggest green tea may help prevent or ease symptoms of rheumatoid arthritis.

tea

ALZHEIMER’S DISEASE

Alzheimer’s disease is a progressive brain disorder that gradually destroys memory and the ability to think and reason. Recent estimates show approximately 4 million people in the U.S. have dementia, most with Alzheimer’s disease.  Alzheimer’s disease usually occurs in individuals who are 60 years old and older. Starting at age 65, the risk of developing the disease doubles every five years. By age 85 years and older, between 25 and 50 percent of people will exhibit signs of Alzheimer’s disease. Up to 5.3 million Americans currently have Alzheimer’s disease. By 2050, the number is expected to more than double due to the aging of the population. Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States and is the fifth leading cause among persons age 65 and older.    http://www.alz.org/what-is-dementia.asp  So let’s ease those stats a bit by eating healthy!

By making some simple adjustments in your diet to include foods high in folate, you can help reduce your risk. According to research, older adults whose diets were high in folate reduced their risk of Alzheimer’s disease by half compared with those whose diets contain less than the Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDA).

Folate has also been shown to lower blood levels of homocysteine, a risk factor for heart disease. High homocysteine levels, as well as decreased folate and vitamin B-12 levels, have also been associated with stroke and Alzheimer’s disease.

A healthy, well-balanced diet is your best option to get the folate you need.  Be sure it includes at least five servings of fresh fruits and vegetables each day. Foods rich in folate include oranges and bananasdark leafy green vegetables, asparagus, broccoli, liver, and many types of beans and peas, including limalentil and garbanzo, as well as fortified breads and cereals.

alz

The antioxidants in apples could help protect the brain from the type of damage that triggers Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease, according to recent research. But it’s estimated that on average Americans only eat approximately one-seventh of an apple per day, nowhere near enough.

Blueberries are an awesome food choice as well to arm your body to combat declining mental capacities.  It’s also imperative to choose unsaturated fats so your circulatory system stays healthy.  Healthy blood flow and blood vessels lessen the chance of brain damage due to strokes or compromised circulation.

As a lifestyle expert, I want everyone to eat clean. Eating clean is life saving and life preserving!  Healthy eating boost your mind, body and soul just like exercise which goes hand in hand with healthy eating.

 

Dementia-specific oral health advice?  Here’s an article compiled from an interview conducted with Dr Sedillo, a member of the Special Care Dentistry Association and an expert in this area. Check out https://www.emergencydentistsusa.com/alzheimers-dental-care/ for learning the importance of oral hygiene especially when coupled with alzheimer’s.

Knowing that eating a particular food not only taste good but packs a whole lot of punch for your health motivates you to eat more of a good thing!

Live abundantly,

Kecia Clarke

Written by Kecia Clarke